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2 edition of Investigation of cell death and aerenchyma formation in roots of maize (Zea Mays L.). found in the catalog.

Investigation of cell death and aerenchyma formation in roots of maize (Zea Mays L.).

A. H. L. A. N. Gunawardena

Investigation of cell death and aerenchyma formation in roots of maize (Zea Mays L.).

by A. H. L. A. N. Gunawardena

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Published by Oxford Brookes University in Oxford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, 2000.

ContributionsOxford Brookes University. School of Biological and Molecular Sciences.
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 219p. :
Number of Pages219
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19495540M

  The first point of aerenchyma formation in maize and rice is the death of cells in the cortex. Cell death in maize then progresses radially and tangentially into surrounding cells . In present investigation, we studied factors which can induce formation of aerenchyma and observed in ragi and rice root sections (waterlogged and control) for aerenchyma. MATERIALS AND METHODS Authentic seeds of ragi variety GPU 28 were procured through courtesy of Dr. Karade, Agricultural Research Station Agriculture College, Kolhapur (MS).

The aerenchyma in maize roots is formed by cell death. Some cells in the cortex lose turgor, appear irregular-concave, lose some contact with neighbour-ing cells, and finally collapse around the periphery of large spaces (Campbell and Drew, ; McPherson, 1 ). .   Aerenchyma tissues form gas-conducting tubes that provide roots with oxygen under hypoxic conditions. Although aerenchyma have received considerable attention in Zea mays, the signaling events and genes controlling aerenchyma induction remain elusive. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls form lysigenous aerenchyma in response to hypoxia and that this Cited by:

An exception is a cDNA with homology to xyloglucan endotransglycosylase that was isolated from anoxic maize roots and may function in cell-wall loosening in aerenchyma formation. It is not yet clear whether the response of seedling maize roots provides a generalized biochemical model, because few other species have received detailed by:   This study investigated aerenchyma formation and function in adventitious roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) when only a part of the root system was exposed to O 2 experimental systems were used: (1) plants in soil waterlogged at mm below the surface; or (2) a nutrient solution system with only the apical region of a single root exposed to deoxygenated stagnant Cited by:


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Investigation of cell death and aerenchyma formation in roots of maize (Zea Mays L.) by A. H. L. A. N. Gunawardena Download PDF EPUB FB2

However, aerenchyma formation requires the death of cells in the root cortex. In maize, hypoxia stimulates ethylene production, which in turn activates a signal transduction pathway involving phosphoinositides and Ca 2+. Death occurs in a predictable pattern, is regulated by a hormone (ethylene) and provides an example of programmed cell by: Lysigenous aerenchyma contributes to the ability of plants to tolerate low-oxygen soil environments, by providing an internal aeration system for the transfer of oxygen from the shoot.

However, aerenchyma formation requires the death of cells in the root cortex. In maize, hypoxia stimulates ethylene production, which in turn activates a signal transduction pathway involving phosphoinositides Cited by: Investigation of cell death and aerenchyma formation in roots of maize (Zea mays l.).

Author: Gunawardena, A. ISNI: Awarding Body: Oxford Brookes University Current Institution: Oxford Brookes University Date of Award. In lysigenous aerenchyma formation in the root cortex of maize, rice and Sagittaria, cell death is first detected at a distance of a cm or less from the root apical meristem, in the zone where cell elongation has just been completed2–4.

The space created by the death of cells becomes increasingly promi-nent in older zones behind the tip. He C, Morgan PW, Drew MC () Transduction of an ethylene signal is required for cell death and lysis in the root cortex of maize during aerenchyma formation induced by hypoxia.

Plant Physiol – CAS; PubMed; Google ScholarCited by: The formation of lysigenous aerenchyma occurs in cortical cells by cellular breakdown as a result of cell death, which is followed in some cases by the destruction of these cells, resulting in the. Aerenchyma is formed in maize (Zea mays) roots in response to different types of stress such as waterlogging, mechanical impedance, drought and nutrient deficiencies.

Ethylene plays a crucial role in aerenchyma formation. Under waterlogged conditions, it can be cumulated in the submerged tissue and induces genes implicated in aerenchyma : Imene Rajhi, Haythem Mhadhbi.

Abstract. Maize (Zea mays L.) is generally considered to be a plant with aerenchyma formation inducible by environmental conditions. In our study, young maize plants, cultivated in various ways in order to minimise the stressing effect of hypoxia, flooding, mechanical impedance or nutrient starvation, were examined for the presence Cited by: No cavities were verified inthe roots of both lines when growing in high-phosphorous.

The first signal of aerenchyma initiation was observed in groups of cells in the middle cortex with turgor loss, however, still attached to their neighbors (Figure 2). After that cell death progressed radially into surrounding cells. Cell death during lysigenous aerenchyma formation has been investigated in maize (Gunawardena et al., ) and hallmark features of PCD were observed during this process including cytoplasmic changes and plasma membrane invagination, DNA internucleosomal fragmentation and chromatin condensation, cellular condensation and the presence of intact organelles surrounded by.

To adapt to waterlogging, maize (Zea mays) forms lysigenous aerenchyma in root cortex as a result of ethylene-promoted programmed cell death (PCD). Respiratory burst oxidase homolog (RBOH) gene encodes a homolog of gp91 phox in NADPH oxidase, and Cited by:   Compared with controls, seedlings that received either hypoxia or mechanical impedance exhibited increased rates of ethylene evolution, greater activities of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC) synthase, ACC oxidase, and cellulase, and more cell death and aerenchyma formation in the root Cited by: during aerenchyma formation, RBOH was upregulated in all maize root tissues examined, whereas an ROS scavenging-related metallothionein (MT) gene was downregulated specifically in cortical cells.

Aerenchyma attributes plant tissues that contain enlarged spaces exceeding those commonly found as intracellular spaces. It is known that sulfur (S) deficiency leads to formation of aerenchyma in maize adventitious roots by lysis of cortical cells. Seven-day-old maize plants were grown in a hydroponics setup for 19 days under S deprivation against full nutrition.

At day 17 and 26 from sowing Cited by: 8. Lysigenous aerenchyma is formed by the death and lysis of cortical cells in roots or parenchyma cells in shoots, whereas schizogenous aerenchyma in roots is formed by the separation of adjacent files of cells through differential division and/or expansion of cortical cells (Justin and Armstrong, ; Seago et al., ; Takahashi et al., Cited by:   Th DEGs are known to regulate important pathways including energy-production, programmed cell death (PCD), aerenchyma formation, and ethylene by: Key words: Aerenchyma, radial transport, root, nutrient uptake, phosphorus, sulfur, calcium, maize, Zea mays.

INTRODUCTION Root cortical aerenchyma (RCA) in maize is formed by pro-grammed cell death of cortical cells, leaving air-filled lacunae (Esau, ). RCA is. plant, aerenchyma, hypoxia, Programmed Cell Death, apoptosis, maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa).

Contents Summary 35 I. Introduction 36 II. Schizogenous aerenchyma formation 36 III. Lysigenous aerenchyma formation 37 IV. Regulators of lysigenous aerenchyma formation 38 V.

Key questions in lysigenous aerenchyma formation 38 VI. Methyl-esterification is increased in Zea mays under hypoxic conditions and upon ethylene induction during root aerenchyma formation (Gunawardena et al., b).

This is apparently a controversial finding, although it is noteworthy that the formation of aerenchyma cells in maize is exclusively lysigenous and involves cell by: 2.

Gunawardena et al., a, b). Aerenchyma formation occurs at a predictable time and location; the cell death process begins in the cortical cells when they are root tip. The formation of aerenchyma is initiated in the midcortex of maize roots and then progresses radially and tangentially into the sur.

Root cortical aerenchyma (RCA) in maize is formed by programmed cell death of cortical cells, leaving air-filled lacunae.

RCA is induced by a variety of stimuli, including hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, mechanical impedance and drought (Drew et al.,; He et al., ; Bouranis et al., ; Zhu et al., ).Cited by:   Figure 1.

Ethylene-Dependent Aerenchyma Formation in Rice Roots. (A) Cross sections at 10 mm from the tips of adventitious roots of rice seedlings grown under aerated or stagnant conditions. Lysigenous aerenchyma is indicated by arrowheads. Bars = μm. (B) The percentage of aerenchyma in root-cross-sectional area at 10 mm from the root tips under aerated or stagnant Cited by:   Transcript profiles in cortical cells of maize primary root during ethylene-induced lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic conditions These observations suggest that Vignain and MC are involved in ethylene-induced lysigenous aerenchyma formation.

Programmed cell death and aerenchyma formation in by: